Digitalization of Scholarly Communication - Towards a Knowledge Graph for Science

Speaker:  Sören Auer – Leipzig, Germany
Topic(s):  Information Systems, Search, Information Retrieval, Database Systems, Data Mining, Data Science

Abstract

Despite an improved digital access to scientific publications in the last decades, the fundamental principles of scholarly communication remain unchanged and continue to be largely document-based. The document-oriented workflows in science have reached the limits of adequacy as highlighted by recent discussions on the increasing proliferation of scientific literature, the deficiency of peer-review and the reproducibility crisis.

Now it is possible to rethink this dominant paradigm of document-centered knowledge exchange and transform it into knowledge-based information flows by representing and expressing knowledge through semantically rich, interlinked knowledge graphs. The core of the establishment of knowledge-based information flows is the creation and evolution of information models for the establishment of a common understanding of data and information between the various stakeholders as well as the integration of these technologies into the infrastructure and processes of search and knowledge exchange in the research library of the future. By integrating these information models into existing and new research infrastructure services, the information structures that are currently still implicit and deeply hidden in documents can be made explicit and directly usable. In this talk, we will discuss

A knowledge-based scholarly communication has the potential to revolutionize scientific work because information and research results can be seamlessly interlinked with each other and better mapped to complex information needs. Also research results become directly comparable and easier to reuse. As a result, we expect a paradigm shift in the methods of academic discourse towards knowledge-based information flows, which facilitate completely new ways of search and exploration. The efficiency and effectiveness of scholarly communication will significant increase, since ambiguities are reduced, reproducibility is facilitated, redundancy is avoided, provenance and contributions can be better traced and the interconnections of research contributions are made more explicit and transparent

About this Lecture

Number of Slides:  20 - 90
Duration:  30 - 120 minutes
Languages Available:  English
Last Updated: 

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