Vehicular Networking

Speaker:  Falko Dressler – Paderborn, Germany
Topic(s):  Architecture, Embedded Systems and Electronics, Robotics

Abstract

Looking back at the last decade, one can observe enormous progress in the domain of vehicular networking. In this growing community, many ongoing activities focus on the design of communication protocols to support safety applications, intelligent navigation, multi-player gaming and others. Very large projects have been initiated to validate the theoretic work in field tests and protocols are being standardized. With the increasing interest from industry, security and privacy have also become crucial aspects in the stage of protocol design in order to support a smooth and carefully planned roll-out. Researchers from academia and industry recently met at an international Dagstuhl seminar to discuss open research challenges as well as open issues related to market-oriented design. We are now entering an era that might change the game in road traffic management. This is supported by the U.S. federal government announcement in February 2014 that National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) plans to begin working on a regulatory proposal that would require V2V devices in new vehicles in a future year. This NHTSA announcement coincides with the final standardization of higher layer networking protocols in Europe by the ETSI.

From an industry point of view, vehicular networking serves as one of the most important enabling technologies required to implement a myriad of applications related to vehicles, vehicle traffic, drivers, passengers and pedestrians. In this tutorial we will look into applications and use cases of vehicular networking followed by an overview of the standardization activities. Next we will cover the communication protocol design as well as the deployment plans. We will also briefly talk about simulation tools for evaluation of various protocol de-signs. Before concluding, we will take a glimpse at the recently emerging reality of electric vehicles and autonomous vehicles along with the issues surrounding them. Finally we will conclude with open issues that require further research. 
 
The lecture is supported by a textbook on Vehicular Networking authored by Falko Dressler and published by Cambridge University Press.

About this Lecture

Number of Slides:  88
Duration:  60 - 120 minutes
Languages Available:  English
Last Updated: 

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