Introduction to Research Methods in Human-Computer Interaction

Speaker:  Kaveh Bazargan – Tehran, Iran
Topic(s):  Human Computer Interaction

Abstract

The output of outstanding Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research can be considered as an input for the work of brilliant designers and engineers that fuel disrupting inventions or major innovations that positively impact our daily lives across the globe. A key historical example is the invention of the computer mouse by Douglas Engelbart, in 1963, who received the first ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Achievement Award in 1998. Three major empirical approaches for conducting research in HCI are: observational methods, experimental methods and correlational methods. Firstly, the observational research methods focus on qualifying people's attitudes, behaviors and experience while interacting with interactive computing systems. In this approach, people's attitudes and behaviors are directly observed in real world context "in the wild" in opposition to controlled laboratory experimental context. Such methods are mostly used for discovering, answering and explaining the "why" questions in relation to what people are saying or doing within a specific interaction context. Secondly, the experimental research methods focus on quantifying people's attitudes, behaviors and experience while interacting with interactive computing systems. Such methods are mostly used for discovering, answering and explaining the "what, where, when" questions in relation to what people are saying or doing within a specific interaction context. Basic HCI experiments involve at least two variables: an independent variable (such as the type of display or interaction technique) and a response variable (such as task completion time). HCI experiments are deeply rooted in the discipline of experimental psychology with background in working with human subjects and measuring the human. Finally, correlational research methods focus on searching, finding and quantifying the relationships between variables. A major challenge that has to be considered by HCI researchers is how to find the right balance between research relevance and research precision on one hand and internal validity and external validity on the other hand.

About this Lecture

Number of Slides:  60
Duration:  90 minutes
Languages Available:  English, French
Last Updated: 

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